Extending the Reach of Natural Heritage and Handicrafts – The New Indian Express

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Express press service

As we made our way to Kisan Haat, Chhatarpur, on a scorching Friday afternoon, we marveled at the traditional handicrafts and artisan wonders we witnessed at “Nature Bazaar”, an annual initiative of the NGO Chhatarpur-based Dastkar—it was founded by social worker Laila Tyabji in 1981. One of the first artisans we noticed in a stall was Mohan Kumar Verma. Sitting among his paintings, the National Award winner

Artist Sanjhi was seen meditatively carving exquisite patterns on paper. At another stall, Teamesswar Dewangan (27), a resident of Chhattisgarh, demonstrated how to use a bamboo rainmaker – a percussion instrument made from bamboo sticks with pebbles or legumes – which he sold with several other bamboo products. Gurugram resident Mamta Gupta beamed as she talked about her products made without artificial preservatives; the recipes for these have been passed down in his family for generations. The 57-year-old was selling pickles, laddoos and namkeens, which she says improve digestion. “I dry my pickles in the sun and I don’t use vinegar as a preservative, I use lemon juice. I stick to homemade products,” she shared. During this bazaar which takes place in the city until September 12, it will be seen how authentic craft traditions are mixed with the idea of ​​​​sustainability and, at the same time, provide a platform for communities and artisans working at the base.

Inspired by nature

Indian artisans are known for using natural materials to create traditional handicrafts that are not only aesthetically pleasing but also functional. For example, Zahid Ansari (34) from Mirzapur, Uttar Pradesh, handcrafts cotton and wool carpets and rugs in the traditional form of “Panja Dari”. From `500, Ansari’s products are environmentally friendly. The same goes for Kailash Chand Patwa (63) from Jaipur. Chand,

which specializes in Patwa art – a yarn craft originating in Rajasthan – sells jewelry, keychains, anklets and more here.

Many vendors we have encountered here work directly with artisans and support their livelihoods. For example, Sankalpa Art Village, an initiative based in Andhra Pradesh, in which in-house artisans create garments using natural dyes. Another company doing something similar is RAWHAA (Rural Active Women’s Handicraft Artisan Association) from Odisha; they use dead palm leaves to make baskets, coasters, etc. Nirupama Jena, a member of RAWHAA, mentions that often their products are completed over days, as everything is made by hand.

Organic products galore

Prices for products on display at this event, especially those made by artisans, are extremely nominal – date palm coasters start at Rs 40, Pattachitra paintings at Rs 50 and bamboo wind chimes start at Rs 100 – especially in relation to the craft products on display. in city spaces.

While the organization has made immense efforts to provide space for artisans from various parts of the country, the hot weather has proven to be a hindrance in attracting customers. “I’ve been coming here for years. This time less people came as we expected it to rain but it didn’t. It’s hot, that’s why people are reluctant [to visit]“, shared Chand. Despite this, exhibitors remain hopeful and are very eager to talk about their work with customers who visit and show interest.

CHECK IT OUT

WHAT: Nature Bazaar
WHEN: Until September 12; 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.
WHERE: Nature Bazaar Location, Anuvrat Marg, Kisan Haat

As we made our way to Kisan Haat, Chhatarpur, on a scorching Friday afternoon, we marveled at the traditional handicrafts and artisan wonders we witnessed at “Nature Bazaar”, an annual initiative of the NGO Chhatarpur-based Dastkar—it was founded by social worker Laila Tyabji in 1981. One of the first artisans we noticed in a stall was Mohan Kumar Verma. Sitting amidst his paintings, National Award-winning artist Sanjhi was seen meditatively carving exquisite patterns on paper. At another stall, Teamesswar Dewangan (27), a resident of Chhattisgarh, demonstrated how to use a bamboo rainmaker – a percussion instrument made from bamboo sticks with pebbles or legumes – which he sold with several other bamboo products. Gurugram resident Mamta Gupta beamed as she talked about her products made without artificial preservatives; the recipes for these have been passed down in his family for generations. The 57-year-old was selling pickles, laddoos and namkeens, which she says improve digestion. “I dry my pickles in the sun and I don’t use vinegar as a preservative, I use lemon juice. I stick to homemade products,” she shared. During this bazaar which takes place in the city until September 12, it will be seen how authentic craft traditions are mixed with the idea of ​​​​sustainability and, at the same time, provide a platform for communities and artisans working at the base. Inspired by nature, Indian artisans are known for using natural materials to create traditional handicrafts that are not only aesthetically pleasing but also functional. For example, Zahid Ansari (34) from Mirzapur, Uttar Pradesh, handcrafts cotton and wool carpets and rugs in the traditional form of “Panja Dari”. From `500, Ansari’s products are environmentally friendly. The same goes for Kailash Chand Patwa (63) from Jaipur. Chand, who specializes in Patwa art – a yarn craft originating in Rajasthan – sells jewelry, keychains, anklets and more here. Many vendors we have encountered here work directly with artisans and support their livelihoods. For example, Sankalpa Art Village, an initiative based in Andhra Pradesh, in which in-house artisans create garments using natural dyes. Another company doing something similar is RAWHAA (Rural Active Women’s Handicraft Artisan Association) from Odisha; they use dead palm leaves to make baskets, coasters, etc. Nirupama Jena, a member of RAWHAA, mentions that often their products are completed over days, as everything is made by hand. Organic products galore Prices for products on display at this event, especially those made by artisans, are extremely nominal – date palm coasters start at Rs 40, Pattachitra paintings at Rs 50 and bamboo wind chimes start at Rs 100 – especially compared to handicrafts on display in city spaces. While the organization has made immense efforts to provide space for artisans from various parts of the country, the hot weather has proven to be a hindrance in attracting customers. “I’ve been coming here for years. This time less people came as we expected it to rain but it didn’t. It’s hot, that’s why people are reluctant [to visit]“, shared Chand. Despite this, exhibitors remain hopeful and are very eager to talk about their work with customers who visit and express interest. Nature Bazaar Location, Anuvrat Marg, Kisan Haat

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